Importance of Biochemistry

How do you get rid of nasal mucus naturally?

Nasal mucus?

 

Nasal mucus:

Nasal mucus can be annoying! How? It is always in your face.

Even worse, it sometimes appears accompanied by capillaries.

We remove nasal mucus with a tissue.

And we never peek at it after that, because that’s bad behavior, but sometimes it happens.

The color of mucus can tell us what is going on inside the nasal passages. Here we go through the different colors and what that means for you.

 

Transparent – you are normal.

Natural mucus is mostly water, protein, antibodies and dissolved salts.

Nasal tissue produces it over time. Most of it flows down the back of the throat towards the stomach, where it dissolves.

White – You’re congested.

The inflamed and swollen tissue in your nose slows the flow of mucus, which causes the mucus to lose moisture and become thick and cloudy.

It could be a sign of a nose infection or a cold Yellow – you have a cold or an infection is developing.

The infection-fighting cells have directed to the site of infection with the microbial infection, and white blood cells are among them.

After exhaustion, it tends to flow with the mucus, which gives the mucus an ocher effect (pale or pale yellow).

Colds usually last 10-14 days. You must take cover and wait until it is gone.

Green – Your immune system is fighting hard.

Mucus is thick and mixed with dead white blood cells and battle debris.

If you are still sick after about 12 days, you should see a doctor. It could be a sinus infection or a bacterial infection.

If you are feverish or nauseous, then you should see a doctor.

Red or pink – it is blood.

The nasal tissue in the nose somehow has broken down – perhaps because it is dry, irritated, or has suffered some kind of impact.

You didn’t put anything in there, did you?

Brown – could be blood.

Most likely it was something that was inhaled, such as dirt or paprika.

Black – If you are not a smoker or take illegal drugs, black mucus indicates a serious fungal infection.

This infection usually occurs in people whose immune system is critically ill.

If you are one of them you are already visiting the doctor, if not you should do so.

additional information:

  • You are producing and swallowing about 1.5 liters of nasal mucus daily.
  • Doctors rarely use nasal mucus in the primary diagnosis of diseases.
  • Do you know how to get super runny nostril on a cold day? And how does one drop sometimes stop at the tip of your nose? It is mostly made of water that has condensed as the cold air passes over the warm nasal tissues. It’s not mucus or not much of it.
  • Wegener’s granulomatosis is a rare disease whose symptoms include persistent nosebleeds, runny nose, and an outflow of pus.

 

Also read it:

Nasal discharge?

Read more:

What are white blood cells and what do they do?

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